Toyota and Redwood Collaborate on Electric Vehicle Battery Recycling

Published on: 24 June 2022
by KnowESG
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Toyota is testing and recycling hybrid electric vehicle batteries in collaboration with Redwood Materials to expand the use of recycled and remanufactured batteries.

The alliance will subsequently seek to broaden the scope of the project to include data management, battery remanufacturing, battery health assessment, and the production of battery-related goods for the North American supply chain.

According to Toyota, the project's objective is to figure out how to incorporate battery recycling through the creation of battery materials into the automaker's North American battery production plan.

Reusing battery materials makes it possible to produce batteries more sustainably and develop what the firm refers to as a closed-loop ecosystem for its supply chain for electric vehicles.

As the use of electric vehicles increases, manufacturers' concerns about the batteries required for their functioning, their components, and what to do with them after their use are growing.

According to the International Energy Agency, there are currently more than 10 million electric vehicles on the road worldwide, and batteries are thought to last between 10 and 13 years.

With the construction of a $1.29 billion plant in North Carolina, Toyota has been involved in electric vehicle battery activities. It is anticipated that this factory will create enough batteries for 1.2 million electric vehicles annually. Toyota will spend a total of $13.6 billion on battery manufacturing by 2030.

More than 6 gigawatts of batteries are delivered annually to Redwood, a battery recycling facility. The materials from the battery's anode and cathode are then replicated for use in creating new batteries. To create more than 1 million electric vehicles annually, the business intends to raise the production of such components to 100 gigawatt-hours by 2025.

Along with Ford and Volvo, Redwood runs a battery recycling programme. The first focus of that effort was on battery recovery in California, where electric car use is among the nation's greatest.

Another carmaker tackling battery recycling is Mercedes-Benz, which is developing a facility in Germany with the ability to recycle 2,500 metric tonnes of batteries annually.

Using an evaporation and crystallisation technique, Li-Cycle recently announced that it would begin producing nickel sulphate and cobalt sulphate for new batteries at its recycling facility in New York.

Source: Environmental Leader

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