EU Preparing to Transition to All-Electric Vehicle Market

Published on: 10 November 2022
by KnowESG
FRANCE PMS22

According to media sources, the European Union is planning to propose pollution regulations for the continent's last generation of combustion engines.

The EU is about to release rules for so-called "Euro 7" engines. These engines will power the last batch of petrol and diesel cars on the market before new pollution laws make them illegal in 2035. Beginning in 2025, the new framework will tighten regulations on pollutants such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides.

The regulations' adoption has been postponed multiple times due to disagreements over their content. Carlos Tavares, CEO of Stellantis NV, and other leaders in the automotive industry have said that the current CO2 reduction measures are too restrictive and will slow the industry's move to electric vehicles.

Supporters of the rules say that some cars that come out between 2025 and 2035 will be sold on the second-hand market and run on the roads for decades, so stricter rules on particulate pollution could end up saving thousands of lives.

"Transition towards zero-emission cars/vans fleet will be spread across at least two decades, not least given the average lifetime of cars/vans of more than 11 years," the draft said. "Meanwhile, to achieve the above policy objectives, the internal combustion-engine vehicles which will continue to be placed on the market need to be as clean as possible."

The measures, which are part of the European Green Deal to put the continent's economy on a more sustainable basis, would establish tighter emissions requirements for all petrol and diesel cars, vans, lorries, and buses.

A decision on Euro 7 would be made after the bloc reached a historic deal last month to ban new cars with combustion engines by 2035. This would force companies to change their lineups. EU Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton said last week that the push could hurt jobs and make cars more expensive. He also hinted that the policy could be delayed until 2026.

Source: Independent.ie

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